• The demand for fresh water sends North America’s growing communities on a search that never ends.
(National Geographic)

• The United Nations (UN) announced a water-shortage crisis and predicted that by 2010 the crisis could catalyst conflicts and wars. Wally N’Dow Director of the UN Center for Human Settlements predicts that dramatic improvements in providing, managing and saving water need to occur immediately.
(CNN)

• The World Bank estimated $600 billion needs to be invested in water delivery systems. CNN also said that the UN reported that the poor are often denied water delivery and frequently have to pay inflated prices to buy commercially packaged water.
(CNN)

• Already there are 80 countries with inadequate water supplies and almost 40% of the world’s population must struggle daily to try to meet water needs. While a growing world population must meet its needs with a finite amount of water, usable supplies are being reduced by pollution from industries and sewage waste through leaking pipe systems, and human greed. (National Geographic)

• Demand for fresh water, whether pumped from wells or delivered from streams, sends North America’s growing communities on a search that never ends.
(National Geographic)

• Every eight seconds a child dies of a water-related disease.
(World Health Organization)

• Nearly a quarter of humanity still remains today without proper access to water and sanitation.
(World Health Organization)

• Over one billion people around the world still lack safe drinking water
(World Health Organization)

• At the Global Consultation of Safe Water and Sanitation for the 1990's, it was stated that universal coverage by the year 2000 would require $50 billion dollars per year.
(World Health Organization)

• Half the world’s hospital beds are filled by people made sick through water-related diseases.
(Water Aid Information page)

• Water use in the U.S. has more than doubled since 1950, at the same time, water-quality problems are limiting the available supply. Where will future supplies come from?
(USGS)

• The worst water shortage is predicted to be in Africa, six out of seven East African countries bordering the Mediterranean will face severe water shortages. Of the 26 countries currently classified by the Food and Agriculture Organization as water deficient, eleven are in Africa.
(United Nations Publications, cp 1997)

• Countries internationally add chemicals as a means of controlling different types of contamination, such as the addition of chlorine or other halogens to control bacteria growth.

• Hundreds of compounds have been identified as direct by-products of chlorine addition to water. At least 70 of these compounds are known carcinogens. Many of the chemicals are toxic at parts-per-million or even parts-per-billion levels.

• The need for clean, safe drinking water is growing as fast as our population. However, the increased rate of urbanization and industrialization have only contributed to the pollution of our water sources. That’s why most tap water is chemically disinfected.
(Advanced Filter Technologies, Inc.)

• Drinking water from municipal or public sources will not give you optimum health, because the public water you frequently drink includes pesticides, radon, lead, and many other toxic contaminants.

• In many municipalities, our water quality simply isn’t good enough; it contains too much lead which affects both children and adults. In a recent report of the United States Preventative Services Task Force, it was estimated that a full 17% of American children suffer from lead toxicity. Lead toxicity can cause anemia, delay mental and physical development and may permanently impair mental abilities.
(United States Preventative Task Force)

• In adults lead causes high blood pressure. The problem with high blood pressure in adult men could be prevented by reducing the lead content in drinking water.
(United States Preventative Task Force)

 
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